Tag Archives: adventure

Coverage of The Waterberg Trust Challenge Rides 2016

TWT Ride 2016 newspaper article

TWT’s sponsored ride across the Waterberg on horseback, as well as TWT’s cycle ride through Norfolk on 12th March 2016, received favourable coverage from Marlene Vermaak in South African newspapers including Die Pos (above) with a colour photo in The Post:

TWT Ride 2016 newspaper article in The Post

Marilyn Cook wrote about TWT in The Source – the magazine of St John’s Church at 24 Rivers in the Waterberg – and we have a photo in the letters page of Cotswold Life, July issue:

rhino

Barry Burles continued his TWT cycle ride initiative by holding another last Saturday! The cyclists came from the Cambridge Rugby Union Football Club and completed the same 82 mile route to Langham in north Norfolk. This time there was a head wind…
Barry was interviewed on Radio Cambridge, and did brilliantly, talking about the work of the Waterberg Trust. Jarrod Taylor, who took part, originates from South Africa and once played rugby for Border. Having just retired from the Cambridge rugby team, he was also interviewed on Radio Cambridge and gave his just giving link inspiring listeners to give.
To listen to the interview, broadcast at 15.45 on Radio Cambridge on 15th June, please click here
New bike and old bike
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A transcript of the article in The Post by Marlene Vermaak:

12 RIDERS – 180KM – 6 DAYS: THE WATERBERG TRUST CHALLENGE RIDE 2016

After the success of 2015’s inaugural event, The Waterberg Trust (TWT) organised the second annual Waterberg Challenge Ride, which took place in March 2016, hosted this year by Ant’s Nest and guided by Ant Baber.

This exciting event, held to raise funds for various Waterberg projects, involved 12 experienced riders crossing 180km of Waterberg wilderness in 6 days. This year’s route went through Ant’s Nest, Kwalata, Lapalala and Jembisa game reserves. Funds raised will be going to Save The Waterberg Rhino and other community projects including the sponsorship of 125 local underprivileged children to attend The Lapalala Wilderness School.

The Waterberg Trust has already been able to help Save The Waterberg Rhino by funding the purchase of vital equipment, such as radios and a metal detector for the police officer dedicated to working with rhino poaching incidents in the Waterberg. Being a UK registered charity, TWT are able to access grants that are not available directly to South African registered Non Profit Organisations, and is able to make increase some UK donations by adding 25% Gift Aid. A number of the UK Trustees have long-standing links with the Waterberg and are committed to helping the people who work so hard running grassroots projects.
The first event hosted by Horizon in 2015 went from Horizon, Koshari, Ant’s Nest, and Lindani, to Jembisa, thanks to support from Shane and Laura Dowinton, David Baber, Dean van Heerden, Ant and Tess Baber, Sam and Peggy van Coller and Charles Whitbread. This sponsored ride raised fund for HIV/Aids programme support, involving  nurse training and two year support for an after school club at the Waterberg Welfare Society. This includes the rental of a house in Vaalwater for the homework facility. TWT was also able to support the Northern Education Trust, sponsoring a Waterberg student through accounting studies at Pretoria University. They are also raising money for Lethabo Kids Club in Leseding who run a much needed Back to School programme, providing school uniforms and more for primary school pupils. Riders were able to visit this project and the Lapalala Wilderness School while they were in the Waterberg.

 

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Thanks to the Back-up Crew

 

TWT team 2016

Riders on The Waterberg Trust Challenge Ride 2016 could never have made it –

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without the help of a gallant back-up crew who brought along food for the horses, cool drinks and the baggage. This included tables and chairs!

Back up crew

Lunch cooked in the bush was much appreciated

Lunch

as riders were hungry and the food fresh.

Lunch in the bush for tired riders

Those looking after the horses took it in turns to ride the spare horses.

Amanda

The days were long and could be hot

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but members of the support crew were able to find time to enjoy the bush and even take a dip in the Palala River

Taking a dip

One of the biggest tasks was trailing the horses home again at the end of the ride.

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We are really appreciative of this along with all the work that went into planning the ride and ensuring it was such a success. Our thanks go to the team at Ant’s Nest and Ant’s Hill as well as all those who helped at Kwalata, Lapalala Wilderness and Jembisa game reserves.

Ant Baber receiving directions

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Last Day of The Waterberg Trust Challenge Ride

After six long days in the saddle, TWT riders made it back to the luxury of Jembisa lodge where they were able to kick off their boots and relax.

reaching Jembisa

The delicious food and beautiful interiors were appreciated all the more for being hard-won. Since Jembisa was sponsoring the ride it was interesting to meet the staff and learn more about the game reserve that stretches up into the hills either side of the Palala River.

Jembisa Lodge

The lodge itself was equipped with anything you would need while staying in the African bush. There was even a salt-water pool where riders could sooth aching muscles.

Pool at Jembisa

Jembisa normally offers safaris for families wanting to explore the African bush. TWT riders enthusiastically grabbed the opportunity to find out more about the Waterberg –

Jembisa

finding out about dung beetles and termite activity

Termite mound

and climbing down the rocky cliffs above the Palala River

Riders on foot

to explore sites inaccessible on horseback.

Intrepid explorers

It was under these overhanging rocks that ancient Bushman paintings were discovered,

Bushmen paintings

along with stone tools and shards of pottery used by the San or ‘People of the Eland’.

Bushman paintingJembisa have been staunch supporters of The Waterberg Trust who aid a range of projects in the region and are doing all they can to help in the battle against rhino poaching by fundraising for Save The Waterberg Rhino. If you would like to know more, please contact us using the Comments box below.

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Riding through Jembisa on Day 6 of the TWT Challenge Ride

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As the weather was relatively cool, Anthony Baber decided to ride north up to the Jembisa wetlands in the morning.

Map of Jembisa

This entailed a bit of hard exercise as we walked up a stony hill past an old Iron Age fort.

Walking uphill on Jembisa

It was worth it to reach a view point that enabled us to look down over the Palala River Valley and the way we’d come.

Sophie Neville

We saw wildebeest, zebra, impala and blesbok along with interesting birds

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and returned to the lodge where Tess Baber and Kelly of Save the Wwaterberg Rhino Trust joined us for lunch outside.

Lunch on Jembisa

That afternoon we rode fast alongside the airfield on Jembisa and along winding tracks through seringa woodland in the low evening light.

Galloping

We saw red heartebeest on our way to a view point where the staff of Jembisa had champagne waiting for us to celebrate the fact that riders had covered more than 175kms.

TWT team after 175kms

Mark, Pippa and Chris

We rode the last 5kms back under dark skies and bid farewell to our gallant horses who were trucked home, two by two.

Campfire

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Riding from Lapalala to Jembisa game reserve on Day 5 of the TWT Challenge Ride

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Visiting Lapalala Wilderness School was much appreciated by TWT Riders who could see that in four days children and their teachers are given an experience that is truly life changing.

Sophie's saddle

We drove back to find our horses that had been saddled up for us and heaved ourselves on board.

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Ant Baber led us through Lapalala, riding fast along the river and up through thick bushveldt until we stopped for break by the Palala River that cuts through the Waterberg

Ant Baber

on its way north to the Limpopo. Recent rain had swelled its capacity in the last week.

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The brave cooled off and all enjoyed a barbeque lunch in the bush.

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Here the horses had a good feed and were able to relax.

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We rode on through the reserve gates, into Louis Nel’s beautiful cattle farm

Becky Overy-Owen

before crossing onto Jembisa game reserve near Kingfisher Cottage. Here we rode past hippo and spotted vervet monkeys in the trees.

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The horses were fed at the manager’s house where there is a good garage for the tack.

Sophie Neville photo Susie Airy

The riders were driven up to Jembisa Lodge where they enjoyed deep baths and dinner on the thatched roof of the veranda. It was hugely appreciated by all.

Dinner at Jembisa

Please click here for The Waterberg Trust Facebook page

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Riding through Lapalala Wilderness

Ginny and Anne

We mounted our horses bright and early on Day 4 of The Waterberg Trust Challenge Ride

Following Ant

and set off into Kwalata game reserve with a map drawn on a piece of cardboard. As we rode into Lapalala Wilderness Ant warned us that if a black rhino charged and we found ourselves on the ground we should either get behind a tree or roll onto our back and kick it in self-defense.

Riding through Lapala Wilderness

We were venturing into truly wild remote country with diverse challenges that included walking the horses down a rocky track for a couple of kilometers passing middens that marked the black rhino territory.  The dung itself had quite an attractive smell.

Walk in the Wilderness

We were probably making too much noise to get close to wildlife but saw giraffe wildebeest, impala and a terrapin.

Lapala Wilderness

After nearly five hours in the saddle we were hugely relieved and deeply grateful to find lunch being cooked for us by the Palala River, along with chairs and a table.

Lunch by the hippo pool

Lunch by the Palala River

The intrepid went off in search of hippo. We had been told there were also crocodile around.

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hippo

We found the horses had been saddled up and rode on through Lapalala,

Amanda

beyond the airstrip where the horses were to spend the night.

TWT Riders 2016 team photo

Here we found a black rhino in one of the game bomas and felt rather glad that he was safely behind a sturdy fence.

Black rhino

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Wildlife spotted on The Waterberg Challenge Ride 2016

Buffalo by Anne Lester

Anne Lester, who came on The Waterberg Challenge Ride in South Africa this March, has just sent in some of the photographs she took of wildlife encountered on horseback.

Giraffe by Anne Lester

We rode close to giraffe, and were able to watch a group of eleven browsing.

Livingstone eland by Anne Lester

This is a breeding herd of rare Livingstone eland, the largest antelope species found in South Africa. We also spotted waterbuck, kudu, nyala, grey duiker, sable, roan, blessbok, oryx, red heartebeest and numerous herds of impala.

Riding with rhino by Anne Lester

You can see how close we were able to get to animals on Ant’s Nest game reserve, a sanctuary for white rhino. Poaching in South Africa has become such a threat that these rhinoceros have had their horns impregnated with poison so they have no market value.

Rhino cow by Anne Lester

The rhinos are accompanied by armed guards 24 hours a day. This is expensive but meant that the animals are well habituated to horses and we managed to get very close.

Baby Rhino by Anne Lester

The good news is that the rhino are breeding well and are in good condition. This calf was born two months ago after a two-year birthing interval.

Riding up to a rhino calf by Anne Lester

We are currently fund-raising for Save The Waterberg Rhino who are striving to protect this special area as well as organising community projects so that local children can learn about the importance of nature conservation and ecology. If you can help, please go to The Waterberg Trust Justgiving.com page here. We have a Facebook page here.

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