Category Archives: Peer Education

Continued support for the needy in the Waterberg

REPORT FOR JULY – AUGUST 2022

Hats provided by the Vaalwater Knitting Club
Children of the Waterberg receiving wooly winter hats from the Knitting Club

Dr Peter Farrant says that Sister Grace continues to do excellent work at various schools in the community. “She is doing home based care, home visits to teenage mums, counselling and support of those struggling with substance abuse, those that are homeless and destitute. This report barely covers the surface of her activity. She attends the schools during school hours. I work with her in a supportive role and also supervise the treatment and therapy as well as monitor the monthly spending and examine the bank account each month.”

The Waterberg Trust
Sister Grace working in schools of the Waterberg

DUTIES:  

Sister Grace has continued to support those needing help and was able to monitor the sick. She distributed donated clothes and disposable sanitary pads to teenage girls.

Some previous beneficiaries have managed to get employed on farms, while others have been helped to start small businesses in poultry, livestock or informal trading by the Department of Agriculture’s subsidy to empower local community members. The beneficiaries who received support applied to the Department of Agriculture. In each and every location there’s a vegetable garden, chickens and livestock.

20220815_152435.jpg

FOOD PARCELS WERE BOUGHT AND COLLECTED

Gifts of clothing

 DONATED CLOTHES AND SANITARY PADS.

MORE PHOTOS ARE AVAILABLE ON POWERPOINT PRESENTATION

Sister Grace working in Leseding Township
Sister Grace donating blankets in Leseding Township in the Waterberg

CLOTHES TO CHILDREN AND ADULTS IN LESEDING TOWNSHIP

CHALLENGES:

  • The sale of alcohol and loud music in the township disrupts learners busy studying and preparing for exams.
  • The Department of Home Affairs is reluctant to renew work permits due to expire by December 2022 ,which causes job insecurity for foreigners.
  • Increase in numbers of teenage pregnancies. Babies are looked after by guardians at home but are vulnerable to malnutrition and illness.
  • Regular community theft by teenage youths who do not attend school and are under the influence of substance abuse and alcohol consumption
  • Increased prices of essential supplies including food makes it difficult for those with low incomes to provide for their families
School girls receiving donations to end period poverty

PROGRESS:

  • Local job opportunities and Social Relief Grants continue to benefit the community.
  • Learners who go to school have access to daily meals from the schools feeding scheme.
  • Guests who visit the surrounding lodges have donated clothes and sanitary pads which have been distributed to those in need or to learners.
  • Locals are benefiting from a recycling project and are able to earn an income after selling the recyclable materials i.e. bottles, card boxes, paper and tins etc

KNITTING CLUB:

A donation of £1 can provide enough wool to knit a hat for a child in need.

The Vaalwater Knitting Club
We continue knitting to bless others

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:

I would like to thank St John The Baptist Church at 24 Rivers, guests from various lodges and individuals who have contributed so much towards the Acts of Mercy Charity which continues to help many people from the community regardless of nationality or cultural beliefs. This has made a huge impact. May God bless you all.

Nursing Sister Grace’s salary is provided by The Waterberg Trust who can accept financial donations in the UK and redeem Gift Aid. You can find different ways of how to make a donation here. Do specify how you wish your donation to be spent, if you like.

Donations of bras and wool are much appreciated if you find yourself going to the Waterberg.

A donated blanket hand-knitted in Vaalwater

News from Vaalwater in the Waterberg

Food parcels distributed in Vaalwater from May to June 2022

As Covid -19 restrictions have been relaxed, many people have returned to their daily routine. Some are employed, others are running small businesses selling farm produce, running hair salons, gardening or recycling. Chicken projects, funded by government vouchers amounting R2000 per person, help to generate income to buy food and essential needs for families.

Sister Grace says, “I reached out to those who really needed social support and have no source of income. I also supported one Matric learner with medication and 4 girls with Matric uniform (golf t-shirts). I donated some clothes to those in need, and baby wear to teenage mums.”

59 people received gifts of essential groceries and clothing this month

School feeding schemes continue to provide meals for learners with many gaining access to meals on daily basis. “We continue to issue basic food parcels to help those in need. Upon arrangement, beneficiaries normally collect their food parcel directly from the supermarket, while some send family members or friends to collect on their behalf.”

The knitting club continues to knit blankets, beanies and jerseys to bless those in need.

A donation of beautiful dresses. Boys received jeans or shoes.

CHALLENGES:

  • Shortage of supplies from the supermarkets. The regular contents of food parcels could not be found in one supermarket. We needed to shop around.
  • The price of food and other essentials has drastically increased and varies from one shop to another.
  • Huge families tend to run out of food. Some received two food parcels to enable them to last for a month.
  • Some had delayed Social Relief Grants, but this has now been rectified.
  • Dysfunctional families continue to abuse social grants by buying alcohol instead of food and essentials.
  • Leseding Township has become a hotspot of community theft and gender-based violence, especially in taverns. Three young men were brutally stabbed to death after a fight.
  • Most children below the age of 15 years are into substance abuse and alcohol consumption, skipping school.
Ending period poverty

PROGRESS:

  • Some individuals have come up with activities for the youth in our community such as sports and a fun run. This happens on weekly basis and children are able to spend time playing at the local park.
  • The Social Relief Grant has been extended, enabling those who apply to support their families.
  • Many small business owners received vouchers through government solidarity funds.
  • Disadvantaged girls continue to receive free sanitary pads during school holidays.
Sister Grace Ismail in the Waterberg
Sister Grace Ismail in the Waterberg

FUTURE PLANS:

  • Sister Grace will continue to reach out to those in need and provide social support.
  • Stakeholders include local churches, Social Development, Community leaders and the local Police Station who inform us of the needy.
  • Sister Grace provides basic health care and methods of contraception in an attempt to reduce teenage pregnancies.

The gift of a new dress

MANY THANKS TO ALL THOSE WHO KEEP DONATING CLOTHES WHICH HELP THE NEEDY CHILDREN AND ADULTS

If you would like to make a financial donation to help this amazing work proceed, please click on TWT’s Donate page for details here

This work is privately funded and supported by the Church of St John the Baptist at 24 Rivers in the Waterberg

Volunteers collect food parcels from the local supermarket

News of aid for the needy in the Waterberg

The donation of a hand-knitted jersey
The donation of a hand-knitted jersey

The work of The Waterberg Trust is being added by a Knitting Club in Vaalwater who have been making blankets and clothing for the needy. Please let us know if you would like to donate money for us to purchase wool, at a reduced price, in the comments below.

ACTS OF MERCY REPORT DECEMBER 2021

Dr Peter Farrant writes to say: “Grace has been busy in the community as you will see. We were able to distribute some seven bed bases and mattresses to deserving people…a lodge in Welgevonden was up grading, and a member of our community assisted with mattresses. Food inflation is a significant problem. The support is therefore needed. Many thanks for the support you give…it is greatly appreciated.”

A gift of useful clothing

Upon identifying those in need Sister Grace bought food parcels and essential supplies during the festive season. She writes to say: “I did my normal assessments in a different way through telephonically and referrals from the community due the rising numbers of Covid 19 cases… This time I did not invite more people to the supermarket but bought food and sent volunteers to deliver it to avoid overcrowding.” She supported a grieving family, who sadly lost a teenager, with a food parcel as the mother is unemployed and had no source of income.

We had 78 beneficiaries this month.

Food parcels for the needy in rural South Africa
Food parcels for the needy in rural South Africa

CHALLENGES:

  • Neglected family members being left without any support, food or shelter. Some beneficiaries abuse social grants intended for buying food. Instead they use the money to buy alcohol or for gambling, which means they have no food for their family
  • Increase in alcohol and substance abuse leading to Gender Based Violence and Community theft
  • Unattended children roaming the streets. One child aged two years was found on the street alone. He was handed over to the local police station for identification as he couldn’t talk.
  • Some elderly parents live alone without primary caregivers and some of are on medication which needs supervision.
  • Poor adherence in some mentally ill patients. They do not understand the proper dosage for their treatment

A kind donation of mattresses

FUTURE PLANS:

  • To ensure that the community, various church leaders and other stakeholders are involved in the Acts of Mercy Activities. i.e. to assist those who are homeless, reunite homeless people with their families and provide appropriate shelter.
  • The knitting club will continue to knit blankets and warm beanies before winter.
  • Sister Grace will engage with families who are neglecting their chronically ill patients and encourage them to support, provide basic needs and ensure they take their medication regularly, as prescribed.
  • She will continue to educate families about the importance of being responsible, help them to understand the purpose of social grants, and to refer those with ID documents to Social Development to be registered in the system.
  • She would like to express appreciation all those who donated clothes, sanitary pads, beds and finances to the Acts of Mercy.

We would like to thank local people for their kind donations of food, clothing and household items.

If you are able to donate funds to help the needy in the Waterberg, please click her for further details.

Sister Grace delivering food and a blanket

TWT donors enable learners in the Waterberg to go on a residental course at Lapalala Wilderness School

Thanks to The Waterberg Trust supporters who made this life-changing experience possible

‘Our courses are no longer regarded as a luxury but rather as a vitally important component of the education of all our children, with the message that the health of people is intimately connected with the health of the environment.’ Chairman of Lapalala Wilderness School

 Clearly, one of the best ways of ensuring future conservation is to educate the young people. 

After delays caused by C-19 Lockdown, and floods that washed away the access road, a group of twenty-two teenage students from Meetsetshehla Sceondary School in Valwater were able to attend a week-long environmental course at Lapalala Wilderness School in 2021. TWT hope to send another group from Leseding High School in Vaalwater soon.

Learners from Meetsetshehla Secondary School in Vaalwater learning about rivers

The main objectives of the Environmental Education programme are:

  • To spark an interest and passion for the natural world and the conservation.
  • To share knowledge relating to local and global environmental issues and sustainable living.
  • To demonstrate how individuals can have a positive impact on the environment.
  • To build team spirit and nurture leadership skills.
  • To cultivate an appreciation and respect for a pristine wilderness environment.

Students learn about recycling, biodiversity and gain practical help if they are seeking a career in tourism and wildlife conservation. For further details of the course, please see Lapalala Wilderness School’s website here.

Learning to identify plants of the Waterberg. There are approx 340 different species of trees in the area.
  • Lapalala Wilderness School can accommodate sixty pupils and two teachers who reside at the Wilderness School for five days, under COVID -19 lockdown regulations
  • It costs R 400 (£19) per person per day.
  • For 62 individuals for five days costs R 124,000 (£5,885)
  • Return transport from Vaalwater costs R10,000 (£475)

This is exceptionally good value. All in all, it costs R 134,000 (£6,360) to host a group, fully inclusive of teaching, equipment, food and accommodation.

If you would like to find out how to sponsor another group of children to attend the Wilderness School, please click here

Leaners on a game drive through Lapalala Wilderness where they saw lion and a variety of antelope

The Chairman of Lapalala Wilderness School writes:

‘In this, our 35th anniversary year, our supporters will be delighted to know that all of our environmental education programmes are being enthusiastically received, not only by primary and secondary schools but also by university students already specialising in aspects of the conservation and management of biodiversity.’

‘We have influenced teachers from a variety of schools to embrace and acknowledge the critical role of environmental conservation in many facets of our daily lives, and our work to identify and nurture the conservation leaders and champions of the future through our youth development programme has never been more urgently needed.’

Students learning about nature conservation and the job opportunities in tourism and wildlife management

‘In all of these activities the Lapalala Wilderness School is most fortunate to be able to call on a talented team of passionate and enthusiastic educators, many of whom are today widely recognised as truly inspiring mentors.’

Leadership and communication skills are nurtured on each course.

‘Our citizens must understand and support the need to conserve water catchments, wetlands, and the many species of plants and animals which receive far too little attention, such as the pollinators so essential for food security.’

Thank you letters from some of the students

The children were truly grateful for the opportunity and wrote to thank the director of Lapalala Wilderness School:

A letter written to thank the director of Lapalala Wilderness School

The course fits in with the national curriculum. Sister Grace founded an Environmental Club for schools in Vaalwater. Members tend vegetable gardens and have been taken to local game reserves.

Back at school: some of the students who attended the Lapalala Wilderness course, with Sister Grace
Extending knowledge learned at Lapalala Wilderness in the school veggie garden established by the TWT corporate sponsor in South Africa: Environmental Impact Management Services.

For further details about Lapalala Wilderness School, please click here

Can you join the Dignity Dreams Club?

School nurse Sister Grace distributing packs of Dignity Dreams washable sanitary pads for schoolgirls

Could you change a schoolgirl’s future?

Did you know that the majority of secondary school girls in the Waterberg can miss a week’s education every month? Can you imagine what this means to their future life chances?

The reason? They lack sanitary protection. You can change this. For just £15 a girl will receive 6 re-suable Dignitary Dreams sanitary pads with two pairs of pants that will last them for 5 years. This is an educational  game-changer, ending shame and improving self-esteem for vulnerable teenagers.

It’s simple, it makes an immediate difference, and has a lifelong benefit.

Can you help?

The Waterberg Trust aims to provide all girls in secondary schools of the Waterberg with an eco-friendly pack of Dignity Dreams reusable sanitary protection.

Please join the Dignity Dreams Club and commit to an annual donation of £15 (or more) in order to provide a girl with sanitary protection.

Click here for our page on ways of making a donation

Sister Grace using a book on how to use the pads

Students are given a talk on puberty and how to use the pads before they are distributed. It is a good opportunity for them to ask questions and learn how to avoid an unplanned pregnancy.

The NGO Dignity Dreams issue a book for teachers to use, helping them to give engaging talks on puberty and the female reproductive system in line with the curriculum. There is also an instruction leaflet in in pack.

The book commissioned by Dignity Dreams for teachers to use when distributing the pads

There are six pads in each pack, designed for washing with Sunlight soap in cold water, rinsed in salty water and dried in hot sun. They are made by outworkers for Dignity Dreams, which is a not-for-profit employment scheme running in Pretoria. In effect, you’d be supporting two charities at once.

Sister Grace showing pupils how the washable pads work

The girls like the design of the pink and green stripped underpants that come in the packs. One pad is equivalent to 144 disposable pads. They say they are both helpful and durable.

Another class of secondary schoolgirls received a pack of re-useable pads

The Waterberg Trust first distributed Dignity Dreams pads in January 2019 thanks to sponsorship from TWT donors and Environmental Impact Management Services who kindly brought a speaker up from Pretoria. You can read about how we equipped 210 girls here.

Speaker Verita Shikwambana from Dignity Dreams

Secondary schools in the Waterberg have an annual intake of 460 girls. This year, we have managed to equip 145 girls entering one of the schools. We need another 315 packs as soon as possible. If you could help with a few it would be hugely appreciated. The girls and their parents are truly grateful.

The total number of girls in the secondary schools of the Waterberg is 948. To help them all we need to purchase another 593 pads. At a cost of £15 for a pack (+courier charges) our aim is to raise £8,895 for this project.

A note of thanks from one of the students

News from School Nurse Grace in the Waterberg

TWT Grace in uniform

On daily basis, I am able to see 20 learners as well as those who are receiving ongoing counselling and check-ups.

Daily routine work at each school:

  • Learners with health related issues come to see me for consultation and examination. For emergencies/priorities e.g. those with fever, epileptic seizures, physical injuries, breathing difficulties, and flu-like illnesses are seen immediately. These may require referral to the clinic or private doctor. During the day I am available to see urgent cases which teachers are unable to deal with.
  • Life style matters such as diabetes, HIV infection, pregnancy, reproductive health issues i.e. menstrual issues, sexual transmitted diseases, mental and emotional issues including depression/psychosis are reported to me on daily basis.
  • I counsel and follow up on these learners on regular basis as appropriate and some of them are referred to the clinic or private doctor for further management. I also do home visits as needed and as time permits. I keep confidential records for each learner and record my daily activities.

SOCIAL MATTERS:

I usually deal with a number of social issues, making referrals to relevant stakeholders. Problems include:

  • Family disputes
  • Drug and alcohol use and abuse including tobacco smoking, cannabis, nyaope and glue
  • Hunger and inadequate food at home
  • Poor living conditions
  • Individual rights abuse e.g. no place to study, drunken family members disrupting the house
  • Physical abuse e.g. beating and causing injury to learners

DAILY SCHEDULE:

My daily schedule continues as agreed with management at the beginning of school programme. I report and sign from Meetsetshehla School every morning, then visit other schools.

  • Monday – Meetsetshehla High School
  • Tuesday & Wednesday – Leseding High School
  • Thursday- Mokolo and Mahlasedi Primary Schools
  • Friday- Meetsetshehla High School until 13.30pm, thereafter I do home visits to identified learners.

STATISTICS – Estimated from my records calculated from daily visits and follow up interventions:

  • Pregnant – 12 (four at Meetshtshehla, six at Leseding High School and two 15 year olds from Mahlasedi Primary) were counselled on average once a week after 30 weeks gestation approximately 108 visits
  • Medical Issues – 54 visits (Some learners were seen more than once)
  • Minor ailments –135 visits
  • Counselling – 63 sessions
  • Referrals – 25 (girls for contraceptives from the local government clinic)
  • Home Visits – 20
  • Health Education – 72 Learners from Leseding High School and 78 from Mokolo Primary School

Pregnant learners are monitored on regular basis to make sure they are attending antenatal clinic. Those under the influence of alcohol and drug abuse continue with counselling, which includes their parents and caregivers at home.

Liaison with the local government clinic is needed to follow up on those who are on chronic medication and to monitor adherence and progress by checking their files. 

CHALLENGES:

  • School programme services for Meetshetshehla Secondary School were affected by the pending appointment of a new Principal.
  • Primary schools are still overcrowded and teachers have difficulty ensuring every learner has been assisted and understands their topics.
  • Interruptions of studies due to unplanned meetings and workshops where learners are returned home without being taught.

PROGRESS:

  • The support for school programme has been acknowledged and welcomed by the surrounding schools and the community, which makes work easier.
  • Mokolo and Mahlasedi primary schools have managed to set up vegetable gardens with the aim of supplementing nutrition to the learners.

Produce from the Metsetshehla School vegetable garden sponsored by Environmental Impact Management Services

  • The Department of Education within the Waterberg district regularly visit the Schools to ensure teachers are doing their job as per requirement and to monitor those who are absent for no reason.
  • The community is involved with recycling and aware about the importance of keeping our town clean whilst they earn extra income from selling the recyclable materials. The environmental club held an awareness campaign to encourage every household to take part with green project by planting trees or to set up a vegetable garden
  • Learners know where to go to access contraceptives and STI screening i.e. the clinic

New uniforms for the school nurse

MEETINGS ATTENDED:

  • We had a meeting with the mayor, and different party leaders to discuss about issues of poor academic performance and standards of Meetsetshehla Secondary School. A follow up meeting by the mayor and party leaders was held on 13th January 2020.
  • The Social Development Services to discuss about ways of issuing food parcels to the vulnerable learners and their families.
  • The Victim Support unit based at the local police station and discussed ways to clamp down illegal drug dealers who supply illicit substances to youth in our community, issues of gender based violence and how we can prevent illegal weapons to enter on school premises.
  • Parents meeting held at the community hall to ensure they get involved in assisting their children to take education seriously and to avoid roaming on streets at awkward hours for safety reasons.

Crop of vegetables grown at Meetshesethla School Veggie Garden

FUTURE PLANS:

  1. To extend school visits to Mothlakamotala High School at least twice per month as it is located 20km away from the feeder schools along the main road by request from parents. Learners who attend at this school come from our surrounding community and would access the services provided by the school nurse.
  2. To ensure more teenage girls access contraceptives to prevent unwanted pregnancies i.e. those who are sexually active.
  3. To educate primary school adolescents about sexual heath and reproductive issues before they reach high school
  4. Monitoring and making follow ups on all babies delivered, those who are under alcohol & drug abuse to continue home visits involving parents.
  5. Every home must understand the importance of nutrition and how to prevent malnutrition in babies that are left at home by learners i.e. to have proper information about balanced diet meals.
  6. Community awareness education about gender based violence, HIV/TB, Alcohol & drug abuse, reproductive and sexuality health and where to go for help and support. Awareness can be raised during parents meetings and by inviting different stake holders like Social Workers, Party representatives, religious leaders and youth representatives to speak to the school community.

Kale grown in a school veggie garden for the nutrition project

ENVIRONMENTAL:

The Green School Program continues. I have been able to set up and maintain a primary school environmental club at Mokolo Primary School. The aim is to expose learners to gardening, wildlife and the importance of conservation. They also received a donation of shade netting, poles, garden tools, compost and seedlings from Environmental Impact Management Services (EIMS). To read more about this, please click here.

Mokolo primary school environmental club – grades 6 and 7

Acknowledgement letters were sent to those who continuously donate assorted items to schools i.e. Clothes, garden tools, educational trips, trees and vegetable seedlings: EIMS, THE FOLD CHILDREN’S HOME, HORIZON HORSE BACK, WATERBERG BIOSPHERE RESERVE and SAVE THE WATERBERG RHINO

Mr Thipe of Mokolo Primary School with Andrew Smith of EIMS

Mokolo primary school has 2,000 learners. Many are orphans and come to school hungry. The garden supplies additional nutrition to the feeding scheme. Mr. Thipe is the teacher in charge for the vegetable garden and links it to his life skills subject. The newly formed environmental club members help to water and maintain the garden.

This is nurse Grace’s new consulting room at Meetsetshehla School.  She needs to add a lock to the door and kit it out. If you would like to help, please click here for different ways to donate.

 

EIMS’ gift of advice & resources for Mokolo Primary School’s vegetable garden

~Mr Thipe with nurse Grace Ismail at Mokolo Primary School’s vegetable garden~

The Environment Club, run by nurse Grace of TWT, have been busy establishing a vegetable garden at Mokolo Primary School in Leseding Township in the heart of the Waterberg . A great deal of effort has been put into cultivation but the project lacked resources.

~Tomato seedlings at Mokolo Primary School vegetable garden in need of shade netting~

The Waterberg has been experiencing a heatwave this Spring and without shade netting it is difficult to get plants established.

~Mr Thipe of Mokolo Primary School with Andrew Smith and his team from EIMS ~

On Friday 25th October, Andrew Smith returned to Vaalwater with the team from Environmental Impact Management Services to offer advice on optimising irrigation.

~Mr Thrip of Mokolo Primary School receiving advice from Andrew Smith of EIMS~

EIMS brought with them a trailer-load of supplies carefully selected to fullfill the needs of a school vegetable garden, help it succeed and provide nutritious food for pupils.

Members of the Environment Club and other pupils helped unload 20 x 20kg bags or organic fertilizer, along with spinach, green pepper, beetroot and tomato plants.

EIMS also donated garden tools, compost, shade netting, fencing material, fence posts and seeds to be planted in their school veggie garden.

Very many thanks to Environmental Impact Management Services for this amazing gift!

Do get in touch if you would like to help uplift the people and place of the Waterberg. It is quick and easy to make a donation here, specifying how you would like to help.

TWT sponsors another residential course at Lapalala Wilderness School

This year, The Waterberg Trust enabled 59 students and two teachers from Meetsetshehla Secondary School in Vaalwater to attend a week’s residential course at Lapalala Wilderness School in the Limpopo Province of South Africa about 3 hours due north of Pretoria.

The group travelled north into the Africa bush on a bus also funded by TWT so that no one was excluded by the cost of transport.

Since other pupils from Meetsetshehla had been on the environmental course on previous years, everyone was expectant, eager to grasp the opportunity to learn about ecology and nature conservation.

After a course on snakes and the value of all creatures in balanced eco-systems there was a module on plastic pollution and re-cycling.  Everyone learned how they can make a difference and improve the environment, allowing wildlife to thrive.

Students donned life-jackets to examine aquatic organisms and try swimming in the Palala River, which runs in front of the eco-school.

This was a new experience for most and proved an opportunity to learn about physics.

Teamwork proved essential when constructing a raft and negotiating the river.

Leadership training has always been recognised as an important life-skill at Lapalala Wilderness. It will be interesting to see if any of these young people take up a career in wildlife conservation or management of natural resources.

Learners were set a number of different challenges during the course of the week.

There were a range of outdoor activities that tested pupils in a variety of ways.

The obstacle course in the African bush was enjoyed by one and all

including the teachers accompanying the teenagers who found themselves wearing many hats.

It proved an unforgettable, life-changing experience. To read more about previous visits to Laplala Wilderness School, funded by TWT and watch a short film, please click here.

If you would like to sponsor children of the Waterberg to go on a 5 day residential course at Lapalala Wilderness, please contact us using the comments blow or find details here.

Nurse Grace at work in the schools of Vaalwater: Part 2

Nursing Sister Grace Ismail has sent us more photographs of her work in the secondary schools of Vaalwater in the Limpopo Province of South Africa:

~Examination couch with linen covers~

‘We received a donation of examination couch which is helping a lot when learners are feeling unwell and can rest before the family takes them to the clinic.

~Grade 8 pupil with chronic illness under diet supervision~

‘We received disposable sanitary pads and bras, which were distributed to leaners of Meetsetshehla and Leseding Secondary Schools. This helped our girl learners a lot and gave them opportunity of attending classes without any worry of menstrual challenges.’

~Girls who received donated sanitary pads~

‘Health education was conducted to all grade 8 learners about hygiene and communicable diseases. These are learners from both Meetsetshehla and Leseding Secondary Schools.’ It was a form of welcome, educating them on the importance of hygiene and prevention of infections in schools. ‘The team from the local government clinic who are involved in youth and gender based programs (Love Life) were also present during the sessions as motivational speakers.’

~Learners participating during class health talk~

 FUTURE PLANS:

  • ‘To reinforce early childhood development from primary school level and ensure the children are well-informed with various issues that will help them to cope in Secondary School.’
  • ‘Meetings with stakeholders will continue as they also contribute to support our learners i.e. The Social Development, Local Government Clinic, Social workers, Police and the Community at large.’
  • ‘To continue supporting girl learners with menstrual issues whenever we receive any donation of sanitary pads in order to keep them in school when menstruating.’
  • ‘To ensure that all the learners with HIV are taking their treatment and adhering to the appointment as scheduled from the clinic.’

~Transformed learner witnessing to students~

  • ‘To have our own library at the school where learners can utilize for study and do their homework. The library in our township is very small that learners are unable to fit in to search for relevant study information on internet and books because of congestion.’

~Women who prepare meals for more than 500 learners daily~

  • ‘Learners have a project called UBUNTU whereby they collect unused clothes from teachers and then donate to the needy in the community, presenting clothes to needy children’

~Donation of clothes to the needy children in the community~

Two pupils represented the school in Provincial competition held in Polokwane City. One boy came 1st in the high jump.~Two who excelled in athletics~

Sister Grace says, ‘I still have more work to do with primary schools next term.’

If you would like to make a donation to support Sister Grace in her work, please click here

Nurse Grace’s work at schools in the Waterberg

The Waterberg Trust instigated the role of School Nurse to minister to the young people and children of Vaalwater in the Waterberg, South Africa in 2018.

Exam on new bed

-A pupil with Sister Grace, using an examination couch donated by Dr Albert Poitier-

Nursing Sister Grace Ismail is the first school nurse assigned to state schools in the Limpopo Province. She is based at Meetsetshehla Secondary School in Vaalwater where she is in the ideal position to help the emerging generation face the HIV/Aids pandemic and cope with problems such as drug and alcohol abuse in the township of Leseding.

Tree Planting (2)

-Tree-planting with students-

500 learners were reached in class this term and offered different healthy topics ranging from hygiene, infection control in schools and HIV/TB prevention.’

Life Orientation Teacher at Leseding HighSchool

-Sister Grace working with the Life Orientation Teacher at Leseding Secondary School- 

Sister Grace has also been working with Life Orientation teachers and Community Workers at the schools, getting pupils keen on growing vegetables and planting trees. This encourages everyone to look to the future and care for their environment.

Working in the garden

-Growing fresh vegetables-

Some learners have psychological trauma and can’t concentrate in class due to dysfunctional families and lack of support.‘ Others have nutritional needs. 

Life Orientation - Working in the garden

Nurse Grace initiated a re-cycling project to generate funds to provide learners with sanitary products so they do not miss school. She gives counselling and careers guidance as well as providing First Aid.

While Dr Peter Farrant of the Northern Education Trust oversees the nursing work, The Waterberg Trust provide this NGO with a grant to pay for Sister Graces salary.

-Sister Grace with the Community Workers programme-

If you could make a donation or monthly contribution to support the school nurse’s life-changing work, please click here for details on TWT’s Donate Page.

Examination on new bed-Sister Grace at work in schools in the Waterberg, Limpopo Province, South Africa-