Category Archives: Vulnerable Children

Learner support programmes at the Waterberg Welfare Society sponsored by TWT

TWT homework club desks and computers

Waterberg Welfare Society’s Educational Support 

TWT recently visited the Waterberg Welfare Society’s homework club and were excited to receive a progress report.

Project Aims:

  • To provide extra tuition in Mathematics, Physical Science, English, Technology, Life Science, Geography and Agricultural Science.
  • To equip learners with broader skills, which will enable them to do well in exams.
  • To motivate learners so they are able to take up challenging subjects and fill the employment gap in the future.

“I never understood the importance of computer training, I thought I know everything to do with technology, I open all my social pages, and always on social media and that made me to think that I am good in technology! But since I started the basic computer literacy program I realized that there is still much to learn, so I am so happy for being part of the study club, so keep up the good work.” Lesego. 

Project Outcomes:

  • Gaining knowledge and learning skills.
  • Improved cooperation between teachers and learners.
  • Improved digital (ICT) skills and better use of learning strategies.
  • Improved social skills and cooperation with peers, promoting adult–child communication.

~Tutors at the Waterberg Welfare Society Homework Club~

Progress in the implementation:

  • Pupils have shown growth and improvement in English presentations and reading.
  • They have learned how to best communicate with one another, giving others the necessary time and a chance to speak.
  • Tremendous progress has been made since the inception of the project. 50 learners (about 75% of the total) passed their first quarter school assessments and are highly motivated. Learners in Matric (grade 12) in 2018 passed their subjects and went on to tertiary education (Institutions of higher learning).
  • Once we get school reports for the 2nd quarter of 2019 we will have the opportunity to analyse and compare the first and second quarter school performance for all registered learners.
  • Overall, the learners have geared themselves towards academic achievement.
  • The programme has become a huge success in the community. 70% of our learners are exposed to basic computer literacy.
  • Learning aid/materials and stationary were purchased. All registered participants receive a daily nutritious snack. This has increased their contribution and commitments in the programme.
  • We have been able to incorporate learning whilst we play ball.

80 people have benefited from this project each month:

45 participants between the ages of 7 – 12 years old (30 girls & 15 boys)

35 participants between the ages of 13-18 years (22 girls & 13 boys)

 

What are the major challenges and how are they overcome?

  • The major challenge was lack of communication skills among participants (talking at each other, not giving each other a chance to speak, disrespecting one another etc.). We were able to overcome this by using a ball as a communication tool, each one speaking with a ball in their hand and giving one another a chance to speak. This helped the kids realise that it is a lot better to listen and understand rather than to talk at each other and that communicating is more than just speaking.
  • The secondary school participants are not able to use a computer and yet they are given lots of school research projects. We have introduced basic computer literacy sessions with participants from the primary phase. This has brought confidence, created skills and and understanding of basic research.
  • Learners tend to deviate from the normal time-table and try to focus on either what they expected or immediate tasks needed by their teachers. This means our planned activities change on an almost daily basis. The educator is forced to alter the plan to suit the learners’ needs. Sometimes the learners bring the subject matter, which is out of the plan for that day, and not part of the subjects mentioned for study. Monitoring of daily tasks becomes a problem. The educator moves around checking learners study programmes but sometimes this is a challenge. A discussion needs to be held with registered participants in order to come to a workable solution. It is always important to involve participants in decision making process.

The impact of the project during the reporting period:

  • Improved social skills of registered kids
  • Improved performance at schools
  • Improved self-esteem and confidence

“… made me to understand challenging topics in Physics like Mechanics,  energy and  in Mathematics. I can now solve problems in Geometry through the help of my Tutor. He has done a perfect job in sharpening many learning mind in Science Subjects. I also now have a career through the help of my Tutor. I appreciate the services given to me”. By Rebecca

What lessons were learnt during the implementation of the project?

  • Communication through various texts, writing, speaking, reading, visuals and drawing.
  • Promoting paired, shared and individual reading is critical, the culture of reading is key and this needs to be promoted at a household level.
  • Exposing participants in various career workshops/session at an early stages in critical.
  • A safe space for participants should always be maintained at all times, this enables them to share some of the frustrations they are encountering in school, the community and at home such as bullying, peer pressure and etc.

~Some members of the Waterberg Welfare Society’s ‘Soul Buddies’ homework club~

 

 

 

 

Dr Peter Farrant of the Northern Education Trust based in the Waterberg

Dr Peter Farrant, who works with The Waterberg Trust

Nurse Grace at work in the schools of Vaalwater: Part 2

Nursing Sister Grace Ismail has sent us more photographs of her work in the secondary schools of Vaalwater in the Limpopo Province of South Africa:

~Examination couch with linen covers~

‘We received a donation of examination couch which is helping a lot when learners are feeling unwell and can rest before the family takes them to the clinic.

~Grade 8 pupil with chronic illness under diet supervision~

‘We received disposable sanitary pads and bras, which were distributed to leaners of Meetsetshehla and Leseding Secondary Schools. This helped our girl learners a lot and gave them opportunity of attending classes without any worry of menstrual challenges.’

~Girls who received donated sanitary pads~

‘Health education was conducted to all grade 8 learners about hygiene and communicable diseases. These are learners from both Meetsetshehla and Leseding Secondary Schools.’ It was a form of welcome, educating them on the importance of hygiene and prevention of infections in schools. ‘The team from the local government clinic who are involved in youth and gender based programs (Love Life) were also present during the sessions as motivational speakers.’

~Learners participating during class health talk~

 FUTURE PLANS:

  • ‘To reinforce early childhood development from primary school level and ensure the children are well-informed with various issues that will help them to cope in Secondary School.’
  • ‘Meetings with stakeholders will continue as they also contribute to support our learners i.e. The Social Development, Local Government Clinic, Social workers, Police and the Community at large.’
  • ‘To continue supporting girl learners with menstrual issues whenever we receive any donation of sanitary pads in order to keep them in school when menstruating.’
  • ‘To ensure that all the learners with HIV are taking their treatment and adhering to the appointment as scheduled from the clinic.’

~Transformed learner witnessing to students~

  • ‘To have our own library at the school where learners can utilize for study and do their homework. The library in our township is very small that learners are unable to fit in to search for relevant study information on internet and books because of congestion.’

~Women who prepare meals for more than 500 learners daily~

  • ‘Learners have a project called UBUNTU whereby they collect unused clothes from teachers and then donate to the needy in the community, presenting clothes to needy children’

~Donation of clothes to the needy children in the community~

Two pupils represented the school in Provincial competition held in Polokwane City. One boy came 1st in the high jump.~Two who excelled in athletics~

Sister Grace says, ‘I still have more work to do with primary schools next term.’

If you would like to make a donation to support Sister Grace in her work, please click here

Nurse Grace’s work at schools in the Waterberg

The Waterberg Trust instigated the role of School Nurse to minister to the young people and children of Vaalwater in the Waterberg, South Africa.

Exam on new bed

-A pupil with Sister Grace, using an examination couch donated by Dr Albert Poitier-

Nursing Sister Grace Ismail is the first school nurse assigned to state schools in the Limpopo Province. She is based at Meetsetshehla Secondary School in Vaalwater where she is in the ideal position to help the emerging generation face the HIV/Aids pandemic and cope with problems such as drug and alcohol abuse in the township of Leseding.

Tree Planting (2)

-Tree-planting with students-

500 learners were reached in class this term and offered different healthy topics ranging from hygiene, infection control in schools and HIV/TB prevention.’

 

Life Orientation Teacher at Leseding HighSchool

-Sister Grace working with the Life Orientation Teacher at Leseding Secondary School- 

Sister Grace has also been working with Life Orientation teachers and Community Workers at the schools, getting pupils keen on growing vegetables and planting trees. This encourages everyone to look to the future and care for their environment.

Working in the garden

-Growing fresh vegetables-

Some learners have psychological trauma and can’t concentrate in class due to dysfunctional families and lack of support.‘ Others have nutritional needs. 

Life Orientation - Working in the garden

Nurse Grace initiated a re-cycling project to generate funds to provide learners with sanitary products so they do not miss school. She gives counselling and careers guidance as well as providing First Aid.

While Dr Peter Farrant of the Northern Education Trust oversees the nursing work, The Waterberg Trust provide this NGO with a grant to pay for Sister Graces salary.

-Sister Grace with the Community Workers programme-

If you could make a donation or monthly contribution to support the school nurse’s life-changing work, please click here for details on TWT’s Donate Page.

Examination on new bed-Sister Grace at work in schools in the Waterberg, Limpopo Province, South Africa-

Viewing Bushmen painting and visiting Lethabo Kid’s Club on day 7 of The Waterberg Trust Challenge Ride 2018

TWT Ride 2018 weaver nests

We woke to the sound of birdsong and were soon up and off, walking to a site of historic interest that cannot be reached on horseback.

TWT Ride Day 7 walking off to Bushmen paintings

Being on foot gave members of the team a chance to study the insect life:

TWT Ride 2018 Day 5 locusts in aloe

Some opted to reach the spot in the Landcruiser

which proved good for warthog-viewing.

The aim of the morning was to climb down the escarpment a little way

to find ancient bushmen paintings, preserved from weathering by overhanging rocks.

We learned about the original inhabitants of the Waterberg who called themselves the people of the eland, hunting with bows tipped with flint arrowheads.

After a quick brunch we drove into Vaalwater to visit Lethabo Kids Club in the township of Leseding.

TWT Ride 2018 Little boy at Lethabo Kids Club

A portion of the money raised by the riders went to  help this outreach that supports little children in the community.

Lethabo Kids Club run a ‘Back to School’ project whereby families battling to kit out their children for school can apply for one item of uniform.

Most of them chose school shoes. These are fitted properly at a local shop who are able to give a discount as up to 160 children were brought along this year.

Riders were thanked and entertained with songs and dancing as more children arrived.

Some of the performances were excellent.

The riders also met Sister Grace who has begun working as a school nurse in Vaalwater.

The Waterberg Trust provide her salary and she has an office at Meetsetshesetla Secondary School. She gave a talk explaining all her job involves, including HIV/Aids prevention and awareness.

We then visited Kamatsogo, a community based sewing project, that has a workshop and craft shop in Vaalwater selling fine embroidery and beaded crafts.

It was great to learn about this  not-for-profit enterprise involving local women.

While some riders returned to Johannesburg airport to catch their flight home, others were able to stay on for a last game drive and evening of celebration under the stars.

The Waterberg Trust would like to extend a big thank you to all the riders and their supporters for raising funds and awareness to uplift the people and place of the Waterberg.

Visiting Lethabo Kid’s Club in Leseding

TWT rider with Letabo Kids Club

TWT Riders were able to visit Lethabo Kids Club in the township of Leseding, which has been run for the last sixteen years by Marilyn Cook – seen here in purple.

Finding out about the Back to School project

As it was the weekend before Easter we handed out Easter eggs as a treat. The youth who help on the project organised games and dancing for the children with vibrant music.

The children normally receive a glass of fresh milk and a peanut butter sandwich when they come to the club for stories and other activities each Wednesday.

Letabo Kids Club uniform

The Waterberg Trust is supporting a ‘Back to School’ project here, which has been working well and ensures all the children are equipped for the new school year in January.

Letabo Kids ClubThe state provide schooling but require each child arrive dressed in uniform, bringing a school bag equipped with stationary. Some families battle to find the money for this.

Letabo Kids club school bag

Lethabo Kids Club help by providing one item of clothing for each child. They first ask the children’s guardians to complete a form confirming they need assistance. So far, more than eighty children have been aided but the need is ever present. Some children have lost their parents and are being brought up by grannys, aunties or older siblings.

If you would like to make a donation to this project, please click here for The Waterberg Trust Justgiving.com page labelling your gift ‘Letabo Kids Club’.

Marilyn Cook with some of the kids

Making a Difference: Teaching Conservation Skills at Lapalala Wilderness School in South Africa

Lapalala Wilderness School wins Eco School Award and inspires others

The Waterberg Trust Challenge Ride 2016 is currently raising funds and looking for sponsorship to help this award winning eco-school on the Palala River in the Limpopo Province of South Africa.

Crossing the Palala River

The Lapalala Wilderness School was established thirty years ago to give children from disadvantaged areas to have the opportunity to spend a week learning about nature conservation while gaining practical skills in the African bush.

Learning about Wildlife

If you would like to support this excellent educational project, you can make a donation on JustGiving via The Waterberg Trust and add a note with your donation specifying “Lapalala Wilderness School”

donate_white Justgiving button

Swimming in the Palala River